2e

Awesome article about Twice-Exceptional kids, Gifted + Learning Disabled = No Desk for You by Daniel Peters in the Huff Post.

This is EXACTLY what we’re going through. It’s a scary article for me to read – exactly what we’re seeing.

He outlines 3 paths for these gifted/LD kids:

  • ID’d gifted, never id’d LD
  • ID’d LD, never id’d gifted
  • strengths and weaknesses cancel each other, never id’d as either.

Love this quote — this is almost verbatim to what we’ve been told:

If you have advanced cognitive and/or academic abilities, you are able to score below to low average and then considered to be doing “fine.”

 

This one gives me strength to fight again:

We do not need our 2e children to be famous, but we do need them to get the assistance they need to do well in school, and further to bring their talents to bare. They have a civil right for a free and appropriate education and the protection of special education laws designed to give ALL students equal access to learning and achievement.

 

This is crucial:

4. Legislators and educational administrators should eliminate any absolute performance requirements from federal, state, or district policies for the identification of children with specific learning disabilities that prohibit the inclusion of higher ability children from needed services.

 

We have been told over and over again that since our daughter isn’t failing, there’s no way she’s getting any help. Thank goodness she has had a few teachers who have, without questioning, provided necessary accommodations that have allowed her to access the education she has a right to access. One problem is that the type of accommodation differs depending on the class. The school allows only one set of accommodations. Again, thankfully we’ve had teachers who have been willing to work with what is needed.

She’s never, ever, ever gotten any specific help for learning disabilities. We’ve been told over and over that she doesn’t qualify and they can’t give her any help.

The little help she’s gotten has been at our expense. As things are getting worse in high school, I so wish we had pushed harder and had sought out other solutions.

In reading the recommendations, I feel somewhat better — as we’ve done ALL of this — over and over and over. Without success. I’m not sure what more I can do.

1. Trust yourself. You know your child better than anyone. If your child is struggling and he/she is not performing to her perceived potential, advocate for him/her.

2. Talk to your child’s teacher and/or appropriate personnel and let them know where and how they are struggling. Request a meeting to discuss your concerns and for strategies to be put in place.

3. Request a comprehensive evaluation in writing if your child’s challenges are not improving despite initial school intervention or services. Pursue qualification for an IEP or Section 504 Plan.

Every student deserves the room, the space, the opportunity to excel — the metaphorical equivalent of a desk of his or her own.

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